BDD TREATMENTS THAT DON’T WORK: HOW MANY PEOPLE GET SURGERY, DERMATOLOGIC TREATMENT, AND OTHER NONPSYCHIATRIC MEDICAL TREATMENT FOR BDD?

Studies have found that 6%-20% of people seeking cosmetic surgery have BDD. One of these studies found that only 7% of women seeking cosmetic surgery had BDD, whereas 33% of the men did. While more studies are needed to confirm these findings, they suggest that a substantial proportion of people— especially men—who have cosmetic surgery may have BDD. In a study that I and my dermatologist colleagues did, 12% of 268 patients seen by the dermatologists had probable BDD. In a study in Turkey, 9% of 159 patients seen by a dermatologist had BDD. These percentages, too, are fairly high.
What about the flip side of this question: the percentage of people with BDD who seek and receive these types of treatments? In a study I did of 250 adults with BDD who saw me for an evaluation or treatment, a majority of them (76%) had sought surgery or medical treatment for their perceived appearance flaws. These 250 individuals requested a total of 785 treatments, so most of them had requested multiple treatments. One person had sought 35 different treatments! Two thirds of the 250 people had actually received surgery or another medical treatment. The group as a whole had actually received a total of 484 such treatments. The results from my series of 200 people with BDD were very similar. In other words, people with BDD seek and receive a lot of nonpsychiatric treatment.
Dermatologic treatment was the type most often asked for and received. It was sought by 55% and received by 45% of the 250 people with BDD. This makes sense when you consider that skin and hair preoccupations are the most common BDD concerns. People most often were treated with antibiotics, but they also received other treatments such as minoxidil for perceived hair thinning. Some even got very powerful treatments—isotretinoin (Accutane) or dermabrasion – for precieved or minimal acne.
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BDD TREATMENTS THAT DON’T WORK: HOW MANY PEOPLE GET SURGERY, DERMATOLOGIC TREATMENT, AND OTHER NONPSYCHIATRIC MEDICAL TREATMENT FOR BDD?Studies have found that 6%-20% of people seeking cosmetic surgery have BDD. One of these studies found that only 7% of women seeking cosmetic surgery had BDD, whereas 33% of the men did. While more studies are needed to confirm these findings, they suggest that a substantial proportion of people— especially men—who have cosmetic surgery may have BDD. In a study that I and my dermatologist colleagues did, 12% of 268 patients seen by the dermatologists had probable BDD. In a study in Turkey, 9% of 159 patients seen by a dermatologist had BDD. These percentages, too, are fairly high.What about the flip side of this question: the percentage of people with BDD who seek and receive these types of treatments? In a study I did of 250 adults with BDD who saw me for an evaluation or treatment, a majority of them (76%) had sought surgery or medical treatment for their perceived appearance flaws. These 250 individuals requested a total of 785 treatments, so most of them had requested multiple treatments. One person had sought 35 different treatments! Two thirds of the 250 people had actually received surgery or another medical treatment. The group as a whole had actually received a total of 484 such treatments. The results from my series of 200 people with BDD were very similar. In other words, people with BDD seek and receive a lot of nonpsychiatric treatment.Dermatologic treatment was the type most often asked for and received. It was sought by 55% and received by 45% of the 250 people with BDD. This makes sense when you consider that skin and hair preoccupations are the most common BDD concerns. People most often were treated with antibiotics, but they also received other treatments such as minoxidil for perceived hair thinning. Some even got very powerful treatments—isotretinoin (Accutane) or dermabrasion – for precieved or minimal acne.*342\204\8*

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