LIVING WITH EPILEPSY/SCHOOL: LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR – LEARNING BY LISTENING

Learning by listening is also a multi-stage process. It involves hearing and paying attention to what is said. It involves transmission of the electrical signals to the association cortex where they must be recognized and associated with memories and actions. Thus, another type of learning problem might be associated with problems in hearing, attending, word recognition, and the association of words with memories.
These are but two of the many multi-step processes that may cause a child to have difficulties with learning. It is rare for anyone to be completely abnormal. More commonly, the child seems to function poorly in one or more processes, with a learning problem the result. Some children learn better by listening to information, others by reading information. Most children will find their own best learning style. Some children with greater weaknesses in one area will require special help to get around their areas of difficulty and to maximize their strengths.
A child who is having learning problems in school, whether he has epilepsy or not, should receive a careful psychological and educational evaluation to identify his areas of strengths arid weaknesses. Only then will the teachers be able to find the best way to help that child to learn. For some children this will mean extra help. For others it may require resource teachers with special training. For still others it may mean repeating a grade, being placed in a slower class, or being placed in a special education class. Each child and his problems are unique. The child and his problems must be individually assessed and a plan developed to meet that child’s specific needs. All of these statements are true for the child with learning problems, whether or not that child has epilepsy. They are not different for the child with epilepsy, the problems are only more common.
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LIVING WITH EPILEPSY/SCHOOL: LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR ¬†- LEARNING BY LISTENINGLearning by listening is also a multi-stage process. It involves hearing and paying attention to what is said. It involves transmission of the electrical signals to the association cortex where they must be recognized and associated with memories and actions. Thus, another type of learning problem might be associated with problems in hearing, attending, word recognition, and the association of words with memories.These are but two of the many multi-step processes that may cause a child to have difficulties with learning. It is rare for anyone to be completely abnormal. More commonly, the child seems to function poorly in one or more processes, with a learning problem the result. Some children learn better by listening to information, others by reading information. Most children will find their own best learning style. Some children with greater weaknesses in one area will require special help to get around their areas of difficulty and to maximize their strengths.A child who is having learning problems in school, whether he has epilepsy or not, should receive a careful psychological and educational evaluation to identify his areas of strengths arid weaknesses. Only then will the teachers be able to find the best way to help that child to learn. For some children this will mean extra help. For others it may require resource teachers with special training. For still others it may mean repeating a grade, being placed in a slower class, or being placed in a special education class. Each child and his problems are unique. The child and his problems must be individually assessed and a plan developed to meet that child’s specific needs. All of these statements are true for the child with learning problems, whether or not that child has epilepsy. They are not different for the child with epilepsy, the problems are only more common.*243\208\8*

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