HIV: RESOURCES-WHERE TO GO FOR HELP: TYPES OF SERVICES

Many organizations offer help of different types to people affected by HIV. The list of these resources, however, is a moving target. Any such list—and there are many—gets outdated fast. New organizations spring up, change the services they offer, change their addresses and phone numbers, expand, merge, or go out of business. Most lists of resources are updated every few months.
Given that, the best thing this book can do is list the types of services that can be available to people affected by HIV, list a few national resources that offer these services, and offer advice on how to find resources that are local.
Types of Services-The types of services an organization offers will depend on, among other things, the purpose of the organization and its geographical location. The range of services is immense, from problems specific to some people (e.g., Spanish-speaking educational counselors) to problems shared by everyone with HIV infection (education on preventing transmission). If the organizations do not offer the services themselves, they will recommend other organizations that do offer the services.
The following is a list of the services organizations may offer. If you need any of these services, call a national organization (see below) to find who in your local area offers the services. Or find a local resource (see below) that offers them.
Alcoholism: the national organization Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) has information on which of its local branches offer groups specific to people with HIV infection who also have problems with alcohol.
Buddy systems: buddies are volunteers, sometimes trained, who provide services that range from filling prescriptions and driving you to the grocery store to cleaning the refrigerator and holding hands.
Children with HIV infection
Counseling: can be individual or group counseling (see below, Support groups)
Drug use and HIV infection
Financial problems
Government reports
HIV testing
Home health care
Hospice care
Hotlines: toll-free phone numbers, either community, state, or national. Ask any question about HIV infection and about services available to people with HIV infection.
Housing problems
Insurance problems
Legal services
Minorities and HIV infection, including organizations with
Spanish-speaking counselors
Nursing homes
Physician referral
Political action, speakers’ bureaus
Preventing transmission of HIV
Religious counseling
Safer sex
Scientific research reports
Sexually transmitted disease testing and treatment
Social workers, who help with plans for recuperating at home, with plans for finances and insurance, with recommendations to different organizations. They are hired by mental health centers, churches, social service agencies, and virtually all hospitals.
Support groups: groups can be specifically for women, gays, drug users couples, caregivers, spouses, the worried well, and people who are HIV-positive, or who have ARC, or who have AIDS.
Transportation
Visiting nurse programs
Women and HIV infection
*249\191\2*

HIV: RESOURCES-WHERE TO GO FOR HELP: TYPES OF SERVICESMany organizations offer help of different types to people affected by HIV. The list of these resources, however, is a moving target. Any such list—and there are many—gets outdated fast. New organizations spring up, change the services they offer, change their addresses and phone numbers, expand, merge, or go out of business. Most lists of resources are updated every few months.     Given that, the best thing this book can do is list the types of services that can be available to people affected by HIV, list a few national resources that offer these services, and offer advice on how to find resources that are local.     Types of Services-The types of services an organization offers will depend on, among other things, the purpose of the organization and its geographical location. The range of services is immense, from problems specific to some people (e.g., Spanish-speaking educational counselors) to problems shared by everyone with HIV infection (education on preventing transmission). If the organizations do not offer the services themselves, they will recommend other organizations that do offer the services.     The following is a list of the services organizations may offer. If you need any of these services, call a national organization (see below) to find who in your local area offers the services. Or find a local resource (see below) that offers them.     Alcoholism: the national organization Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) has information on which of its local branches offer groups specific to people with HIV infection who also have problems with alcohol.     Buddy systems: buddies are volunteers, sometimes trained, who provide services that range from filling prescriptions and driving you to the grocery store to cleaning the refrigerator and holding hands.     Children with HIV infection     Counseling: can be individual or group counseling (see below, Support groups)     Drug use and HIV infection      Financial problems      Government reports      HIV testing      Home health care      Hospice care     Hotlines: toll-free phone numbers, either community, state, or national. Ask any question about HIV infection and about services available to people with HIV infection.     Housing problems      Insurance problems      Legal services     Minorities and HIV infection, including organizations with      Spanish-speaking counselors     Nursing homes     Physician referral     Political action, speakers’ bureaus     Preventing transmission of HIV     Religious counseling     Safer sex     Scientific research reports     Sexually transmitted disease testing and treatment     Social workers, who help with plans for recuperating at home, with plans for finances and insurance, with recommendations to different organizations. They are hired by mental health centers, churches, social service agencies, and virtually all hospitals.     Support groups: groups can be specifically for women, gays, drug users couples, caregivers, spouses, the worried well, and people who are HIV-positive, or who have ARC, or who have AIDS.     Transportation      Visiting nurse programs      Women and HIV infection*249\191\2*

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